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Jul 29, 2015 8:45 EST

Mist Launches Internet of Things Sprinkler System to help fight the Drought

iCrowdNewswire - Jul 29, 2015

California is facing one of the most severe droughts on record, with Governor Brown declaring a drought State of Emergency. Mist Labs, a Silicon Valley startup has arrived to help with their smart sprinkler controller, Mist. Mist uses wireless moisture sensors to measure real-time water needs across the yard. Instead of a traditional sprinkler timer which waters regardless of weather or need, Mist waters autonomously and on-demand. Homeowners easily keep their lawn and plants healthy, while eliminating overwatering. Homes that use this smart hardware save up to 50% on yard watering. Mist launched today on Indiegogo: igg.me/at/getmist

Traditional sprinkler control systems are inherently inefficient and difficult to use.  With no sensors, they have no insight into the real water needs of a yard, which are constantly changing and can vary drastically across a specific homeowner’s property. Mist uses solar-powered, wireless sensors that monitor soil moisture levels around the yard, precisely and in real-time. Mist can confirm that the water is being absorbed into a plant’s roots. This enables Mist to use advanced deep-watering techniques that make plants stronger and less water-dependent. If you live in California or any other arid Western state, you can select a special Drought Mode, that waters minimally, but enough to keep your plants alive.  Mist can also be programmed to obey watering laws. Homeowners can set up restricted hours and days in the Mist app, so the on-demand watering will never put them in violation of local watering rules and regulations. Together, these improvements lead to huge water savings which can be reviewed anytime from the Mist smartphone app.

Mist is a must-have for Smart Home fans who want to finally bring home automation to their yards. The days of twisting knobs in a dusty sprinkler box and trying to remember if the front yard rose bush is zone 3 or zone 4 are over. Never program sprinklers again. Never water when it is raining again. Never get a huge surprise water bill again. As more IoT devices become available, homes are becoming smart, don’t let the sprinklers stay dumb. Save money, and beat the drought. That’s the power of Mist.

The severity of the California drought is unprecedented. Outdoor watering accounts for half of home water use. Mist was built in Silicon Valley and was designed specifically to help combat the California drought by eliminating outdoor water waste. The EPA estimates (sourcehttp://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/pubs/outdoor.html) that as much as 50 percent of the water used for outdoor watering is wasted due to evaporation, wind, or runoff caused by inefficient irrigation methods and systems. The Scientific American reports that the water sprinklers that keep the lawn lush and the flowers blooming can consume 265 gallons an hour, which is more than some US homes use in a day. (sourcehttp://www.scientificamerican.com/article/top-10-water-wasters/) Mist cuts the amount of water used (and users water bills) in half, by intelligently applying the best watering methods and behaviors.

Mist Labs is an experienced and dedicated team of Silicon Valley engineers and designers committed to making smart home products that save you time, water and money. The team is lead by Matt Kresse, and Ugur Oezdemir. Matt has a strong background of using tech to promote pro-environmental behavior. He worked at the Stanford Persuasive Tech Lab and was a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Sustainable Consumption. Ugur is the technical lead with over 10 years industry experience as a full-stack engineer. Together, they have used their engineering experience to build the Mist smart system that waters autonomously and on-demand. Mist Labs was one of the startups selected to join Radicand Lab, a hardware startup incubator in Redwood City, CA. Mist promises to save homeowners time, money and use up to 50% less water, and it just might put a dent in the California drought.

Contact Information:

[email protected]

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